We have Korean food on the brain and especially the Korean food in New Malden. I’m keen for us to try all the restaurants in the area but for our last two visits, we’ve stuck with one about which we’ve heard good things – Yami, located on the high street.

We first visited for lunch one Sunday and I was surprised to discover that their lunch menu was available all through the week. There’s no barbecue meats on it but there’s a very good range of dishes. We selected a few and to my delight, three banchan were brought to our table; there was kimchi, spicy pickled cucumber and stewed potatoes. It’s nice to get these traditional Korean little dishes; I take an immediate dislike to restaurants charging for a small dish of kimchi!

Banchan

A plate of Korean sweet and spicy fried chicken were little nuggets of fried goodness.

Korean Sweet and Spicy Fried Chicken

The seafood pajeon was excellent – not at all greasy like many pancakes I’ve come across.

Seafood Pajeon

Finally, we also split a proper stone bowl bibimbap, which came with a side of some kind of fermented bean soup. Lots of vegetables, a bit of marinated beef and a raw egg – good stuff!

Bibimbap and Soup

Bibimbap

The grand total for all of this (excluding service) was £15 – yes, only £5 each dish! But unfortunately, that was late last year and now the prices have gone up a little. And it’s still a bargain at only £5.90 each dish at lunchtime. Prices are a pound or two more at dinner time.

We knew we’d return but it was only earlier this month that we got around to it. This time, we were there for dinner and in particular for Korean barbecue. And again, banchan! The kimchi remained but we also got some soy marinated eggs and a salad with a sweet mayo dressing.

Banchan

Our first round of barbecue was unmarinated sliced ox tongue. Alongside, we ordered a basket of lettuce and there were slices of raw garlic, green chili, and bean paste too. Oh, and possibly my favourite surprisingly simple dip for the slightly chewy unmarinated thinly sliced tongue – sesame oil and salt.

Ox Tongue and Lettuce

Grilled Ox Tongue

We knew we’d need some rice with our meal and with Blai also wanting japchae, the Korean glass noodle stirfry, we were thrilled to be able to order both together at once! Japchae and rice – and I think it’s cheaper ordering them together than separately too.

Japchae and Rice

At this point, our waitress came along, scraped clean our grill and heated it again. Our marinated beef – galbi – came in a massive and intimidating Swiss roll. Not to worry: a waiter came along and proceeded to unroll the meat directly onto the grill, cutting it into bite sized pieces with scissors as he went along.

A Roll of Marinated Beef

Grilled Marinated Beef

That beef was fabulous and we were in raptures about it. Incredibly tender and flavoursome, I know we’ll be ordering it again next time! Our dinner total came to £30 for the two of us (bargain!) and we were absolutely stuffed. Keep in mind that if you do opt for barbecue you do need to have at least two orders of meat. Not a problem for us!

Yami
69 High St
New Malden KT3 4BT

Yami on Urbanspoon

I’ve been walking by the Lanzhou Noodle Bar (on Cranbourn Street, just around the corner from the entrance to Leicester Square station) without ever paying it much attention. In the window are steam trays filled with the kind of buffet Chinese food that you expect an unsuspecting tourist to order, thinking that this is what real Chinese food is like in London’s Chinatown. Well, who’s the noob now?! It turns out that behind that false front is noodle heaven. (With thanks to Lizzie as I read about the place on her blog first – and yet still couldn’t find it, sigh)

They’ve got an a la carte menu filled with various dishes – I turned immediately to the noodle chart where there’s a choice of either handpulled noodles (la mian – famous in the city of Lanzhou) or hand cut noodles (dao xiao mian), either in a soup or stir-fried. Various meaty additions are available.

On my visit there, I was placed on some strange bar-like seating which I had to share with two guys trying to keep their elbows to themselves. I ordered some tea and a bowl of hot and sour sliced beef handpulled noodle soup and waited while noodles were pulled and thumped behind me. My tea came in a styrofoam cup, which was a bit unwieldy but did its job.

Dotted on the tables were jars of ‘Shanghai red beancurd’ that turned out to be filled instead with what appeared to be homemade chilli oil. Help yourself!

Chilli Oil

After a little wait, a massive bowl of noodle soup was plonked down in front of me. There was a good spicy and gently sour broth, beautifully thin noodles (I asked for thin, I’ll probably go with regular next time), and lots of sliced beef and some token bok choy too.

Hot and Sour Sliced Beef Hand Pulled Noodle Soup

Just having it steam up my face was extremely comforting and yes, it was delicious. The noodles were slippery smooth and somehow I managed to put away the entire bowl. Don’t worry about heat levels – the hot and sour were quite gentle. For real heat, you’ve got to add that chili oil on the table.

And Lanzhou Noodle Bar is definitely not a place to linger – order, eat and go. I’m a-ok with that when the bill is about £8.

Lanzhou Noodle Bar
33 Cranbourn Street
London WC2H 7AD

Lanzhou on Urbanspoon

I’m a huge fan of Cuban food. No, I’ve not been to Cuba; my only experiences have been in Florida and what I’ve had had been fantastic. I’ve been looking for Cuban food in London but most of the “Cuban” restaurants seem more focused on the vibe rather than the food. I’d have to figure out how to cook it at home.

Luckily, there are a lot of Cuban recipes online and many Cuban recipe blogs coming out of Florida. I recently learned of one classic French-inspired braised chicken dish called fricasé de pollo. One Saturday while working from home, I realised I had most of the ingredients to make this fricasé in my fridge. The recipe (I put together from various recipes on the internet) takes a little preparation beforehand in the form of marinading the chicken but as usual, it’s worth it. All the tomatoes and chicken and raisins give a richness and sweetness that’s perfectly balanced by the citrus juices and olives and capers.

Fricase de Pollo

Fricasé de Pollo
serves 3-4.

1 kg of chicken parts (I used drumsticks and thighs)
juice of 1 lemon
juice of 1 orange
3 cloves garlic, minced
olive oil
salt and freshly ground black pepper
1 large onion, chopped
1 green pepper, chopped (I didn’t have this and left it out – it didn’t harm the dish)
2 bay leaves
1 heaped teaspoon dried oregano
1 scant teaspoon ground cumin
1/2 cup wine
about 200ml passata
1/2 cup pimento-stuffed green olives
a few teaspoons of capers
1/4 cup raisins
2 tbsps roughly chopped parsley
3 small-medium potatoes, peeled and cut into large chunks

In a large non-reactive bowl, mix together the juices, the garlic, a drizzle of olive oil, a large pinch of salt and plenty of freshly ground black pepper. Whisk this all together and then mix in the chicken parts, ensuring that all parts are evenly coated. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and keep in the fridge for at least a few hours or overnight.

In a large and deep saute pan, heat a little olive oil over medium high heat. Dab each chicken piece dry with some kitchen paper (reserving the marinade in the bowl) and brown in batches. Set the chicken aside.

Reduce the heat to medium and add a little more olive oil if required. Saute the onion and green pepper (if using) until translucent. Add the oregano, cumin and bay leaves and fry for another minute. Deglaze the pan with the wine, stirring up any chicken bits. Stir in the passata and place the chicken pieces back into the pan in one layer. Add just enough water to cover the chicken pieces. Add the reserved marinade, olives, capers, raisins, parsley, and potatoes. Bring to a simmer and cover.

When the potatoes and chicken are cooked through (mine were after about 30 minutes), serve. This is perfect over white rice and black beans if you have any.

It turns out that I’m one bus ride away from Crystal Palace, which I’ve been wanting to visit for a while to see the Victorian dinosaur models in Crystal Palace park. Of course, the Sunday I chose turned out to be freezing and wet, all the more reason to stay for a long lunch at nearby Mi Cocina Es Tuya, one of only two Venezuelan restaurants in London (and this was the only one for a long time). It’s a remarkably cosy and friendly place and the owner will happily engage in discourse on Venezuela and music and music in Venezuela.

I love the fruit shakes that one sees on the menus on South American restaurants and Venezuela is no different. I had a guanabana (soursop) smoothie while Blai had the Venezuelan version of chicha. In many South American countries, chicha is usually a maize based beverage that is usually fermented. The emphasis is on usually as there are clearly many different types of chicha. In Venezuela, chicha is a very rich and very thick rice based drink that is not fermented. It was described to us as having cooked rice and condensed milk and came out with a sprinkle of cinnamon on top, being very sweet and tasting like a thick pureed rice pudding. The chicha was almost a meal in itself!

Guanabana Smoothie and Chicha

Brought with the drinks were a pair of sauces that were on every table – I think this was a Venezuelan guasacaca, a garlicky avocado salsa, and a chilli sauce. I like good sauces and of these two, that guasacaca was very moreish.

Guasacaca and Chili Sauce

Between the two of us, we split a couple of things. First, a cachapa with chicken, and a side of cheese. This was a thick fresh corn cake topped with spiced chicken and with a side of fresh crumbly white cheese on the side. The sweet and slightly spicy and salty all went together brilliantly and I loved it with lashings of the guasacaca and chilli sauces.

Cheese and Chicken Cachapa

We also split what was described as Venezuela’s national dish – pabellón criollo. This is a plate of rice and black beans and slow cooked shredded spiced beef. We got some sweet fried plantains on top too. This was especially comforting on that cold Sunday and also ridiculously delicious. I’m a huge fan of rice and beans and this was excellent. It also comes in pork and chicken versions.

Pabellón de Carne

Dessert was always in the forefront of my mind ever since I spotted a massive cake sitting on the counter at the back. In a large casserole dish was said meringue-topped cake, sitting in a moat of the three milks, slowly soaking it all in. This was their torta tres leches and it was utterly luscious. This was indeed one of the best tres leches cakes I’ve ever had.

Torta Tres Leches, from the other side

The total for lunch came to about £30.00 and I recommend getting here either early or late on Sundays to get a table. You may not be near Crystal Palace but eating here does give you an excuse to visit the dinosaurs!

Mi Cocina Es Tuya
61 Westow Street
Crystal Palace
London SE19 3RW

Mi Cocina Es Tuya - Café Latino on Urbanspoon

I’ve been wanting to cook this Japanese dish for a long time. I say Japanese but to be more specific, taco rice originated in Okinawa, the southernmost prefecture of Japan and where the US military has a presence. I guess it’s no surprise then that this mishmash of Tex-Mex and Japanese cuisines developed there! There’s no carnitas or barbacoa here – we’re getting down and homey with seasoned minced beef. And the toppings are just as you’d find them at any proper Tex-Mex joint – shredded cheese, lettuce, tomatoes. And all of it on rice.

Taco Rice!

The dish is supremely comforting and I reckon we’re going to have it often. There’s the contrast of the hot rice and beef with the cold toppings and dare I say it? – I think it’s all even better on rice than on a tortilla!

Taco Rice
serves 2.

250g minced beef
1 tbsp olive oil
1/2 tsp ground cumin
1/2 tsp chilli powder/cayenne pepper
1 tsp Worcestershire sauce
2 tbsps ketchup
100ml water
hot sauce to taste
salt and freshly ground black pepper

To serve:
cooked white Japanese rice
shredded cheese
shredded lettuce
chopped tomatoes
chopped avocado
sour cream or Greek yoghurt
salsa

This recipe makes quite a mild taco beef mixture; increase the chilli powder and hot sauce for more heat. In a hot frying pan, heat the olive oil and fry the minced beef, breaking it up as you go along. When the beef has browned, add the cumin and chilli powder and continue frying for a bit. Add the Worcestershire sauce, ketchup, water and hot sauce to taste and let it all bubble together slowly until you get a generally dry yet moist mixture. You’ll just know. Salt and pepper to taste.

To serve, place some rice into a bowl or onto a plate. Top with the taco beef mixture and then some shredded cheese. Top with the rest of the ingredients as you desire and serve.

A group of us from work recently celebrated a colleague’s birthday at Greek Affair in Notting Hill, a small homey Greek restaurant that I’ve been wanting to try for a while, especially after hearing about their Grand Meze menu. This is a selection of ten starters (meze) and four main courses and is available for a minimum of two people (£22 per person). For our large group, this was a great choice, taking away much of the decision making process that can take forever when there are so many of us!

The restaurant was much larger than expected and our large group was seated in the private room upstairs. We were hungry, we ordered the Grand Meze as recommended, and luckily, we didn’t have to wait long for a lot of good food to come our way. The cold starters came out first. A garlicky tzatziki, a white taramosalata and an excellent hummus were accompanied with lots of warm Greek bread.

Tzatziki, Taramosalata, Hummus

I somehow managed not to get photos of the two other cold dishes but one was a delicious aubergine salad called melitzanosalata and the other was dolmades, those ubiquitous grape leaf wrapped rice bundles (these were just ok).

After a brief pause, the hot starters then started arriving. There was a hot aubergine and potato salad whose name I cannot recall but it was delicious!

Aubergine and Potatoes

Kalamari tiganiko were some very nice fried calamari.

Kalamari Tiganiko

I loved the hot meaty meze that arrived next – soutzoukakia were tender meatballs in a tomato sauce.

Soutzoukakia

Keftedakia were one of my favourites. These fried meatballs were juicy and flavourful and incredibly moreish.

Keftedakia

Loukaniko horiatiko were fried slices of a smoked Greek sausage. As you can imagine, we were already eating possibly too much and too many of the starters, not planning well for the main courses that were to come.

Loukaniko Horiatiko

And as foreseen, the main courses were generously portioned, especially after all the meze. Elliniki Salata was like all the excellent Greek salads I had in Greece, topped with a lovely slab of feta.

Elliniki Salata

Their moussaka had a thick layer of bechamel on top of all that minced lamb and vegetables.

Kleftiko

Kleftiko didn’t look as I’m normally used to but here were chunks of tender lamb served with a massive portion of stewed potatoes. This went down a storm at our table!

Kleftiko

Kotopoulo fournou was a bowl of chicken pieces that didn’t particular excite us at first but upon trying just a bite, I fell rapturously onto an awful lot of it. The chicken had been marinated for quite a while and then braised until it was falling apart.

Kotopoulo Fournou

No dessert this time as we had birthday cake but I was so stuffed that fitting in a sliver proved to be a challenge – I was ready to burst! And there were even leftovers to pack away. Anyway, Greek Affair is a good place for a large group as there’s plenty of good food and they’re very good at taking care of vegetarians in the group, with our friends given extra dishes and plenty of vegetarian moussaka. Thumbs up then for the Greek food at Greek Affair!

Greek Affair
1 Hillgate Street
Notting Hill Gate
London W8 7SP

Greek Affair on Urbanspoon

It’s Chinese New Year on Thursday 19 February and we’ll be entering the Year of the Sheep then (sometimes also referred to as the Year of the Goat). To celebrate this occasion, I was invited to try the Chinese New Year menu at HKK, part of the Hakkasan Group here in London. HKK only serves tasting menus in the evening but from 26 January to 28 February, the menu is one specially designed by Tong Chee Hwee, executive head chef of the Hakkasan Group, with all eight of China’s great regional cuisines represented – a veritable culinary journey through the country. We were clearly going to be in for a treat.

The restaurant isn’t very far from Liverpool Street station and to my surprise (I hadn’t paid much attention to the address until I got there), the restaurant is located at 88 Worship Street. 88! (If you don’t know, 8 is a very lucky number in Chinese.) Inside, the restaurant was smaller than I expected but it’s cosy, not crowded. We were led to our table where we were first presented with a drinks menu and then a beautiful specially illustrated menu for the Chinese New Year meal. To drink, knowing we had 10 courses ahead of us, we chose a medium bodied tea (a Dong Ding oolong) to accompany our meal.

The Chinese New Year menu at HKK London is beautiful! #hkk #hkklondon #hkkculinaryjourney #chinesenewyear

First up was Marinated Duke of Berkshire pork with Osmanthus wine jelly, representative of Su Cuisine from Suzhou and Jiangsu. The light jellied bites were perfectly paired with the sweet and sour balsamic vinegar.

Marinated Duke of Berkshire pork with Osmanthus wine jelly

For Lu Cuisine from Beijing and Shandong, it had to be the Cherry wood roasted Peking duck. Here’s one of the chefs carving up our duck and Pedro plating it up.

Slicing and Serving the Duck

This was some of the best duck we’d ever had in London. We were instructed to start with the crisp skin with sugar, then eat the delectably dressed little salad, move on to the succulent slice of duck meat and skin and finally finish with the duck in the pancake. I could have had another three plates of this (but perhaps just having one is for the best!).

Cherry wood roasted Peking duck

From the south in Guangdong comes Yue (or Cantonese) Cuisine. Here we were presented a steamer basket with a Dim sum trilogy. This was a little sampling of the dim sum they offer at lunch (from an a la carte menu). Pink was a goji berry and prawn dumpling and green was a chicken and black truffle dumpling but the fried king crab puff was my favourite! The paintbrush turned out to be a perfect applicator for soy sauce!

Dim sum trilogy

Fujian’s Min Cuisine was represented by Monk Jumps Over The Wall, a classic broth filled with luxurious seafood – abalone, sea cucumber, dried scallops and imitation sharks fin. The story goes that the smell of this soup was so enticing that it prompted a monk to jump over the wall to get some (and, of course, break his vegetarian diet!).

Monk Jumps Over The Wall

As our waiter cleared our bowls, he announced that that was the end of our starters and the start of our main courses. The first main came from Hunan (Xiang Cuisine) and was Pan-grilled Chilean seabass in Sha Cha sauce. These rolls of fish filled with crunchy vegetables and mushrooms were utterly gorgeous, especially with the slightly spicy sauce and that crunchy sweet potato ribbon.

Pan-grilled Chilean seabass in Sha Cha sauce

Hui Cuisine from Anhui came next. This was Jasmine tea smoked poussin, which while pleasant enough probably didn’t require the black truffled mushrooms underneath. The strong truffle flavour certainly overpowered whatever hint of jasmine and smoke there may have been in the bird. This was the only weak point in the meal.

Jasmine tea smoked poussin

Luckily, the Braised King soy Wagyu beef with Merlot (Zhe Cuisine from Zhejiang) made up for the previous course. That beef melted in the mouth and we wiped up every bit of that luscious sauce. That green flag on top was the stem of pak choi; now I normally consider this to be one of the more boring Chinese vegetables but its juicy blandness here was a perfect foil to the rich beef.

Braised King soy Wagyu beef with Merlot

Finally we travelled to Sichuan for Chuan Cuisine. The Sichuan chargrilled New Zealand scampi was cooked beautifully and there is certainly some good heat in the mala sauce!

Sichuan chargrilled New Zealand scampi

It’s here I’ll pause and point out that the dishes came out quite quickly, without lengthy waits in between the courses. It wasn’t quick enough to feel rushed but I thought it was all very well paced. We were asked if we would like a break between the savouries and dessert but we were ready to soldier on. Bring it.

Desserts were Chinese inspired and were the perfect playful ending to the meal. A Trio of dark chocolate dumplings with yuzu and ginger infusion burst in the mouth and the rich chocolate was cut with the zing of the infusion poured on top.

Trio of dark chocolate dumplings with yuzu and ginger infusion

Our second dessert and final course of the tasting menu was all sheep! See the spun sugar ‘wool’ on the middle of the plate? This was the Sheep’s milk mousse, pandan curd and caramelised puff rice, a combination that originally didn’t call out to me but trust me when I say it’s incredible.

Sheep’s milk mousse, pandan curd and caramelised puff rice

Of course, a 10-course tasting menu at HKK doesn’t come cheap (it’s £98) but then again, this isn’t an everyday restaurant. With only tasting menus available in the evenings, it’s clearly for special occasions and we felt the price was about correct for the outstanding food and for a special event. There’s an 8-course menu also available for £68; it’s the 10-course menu but without the pricier shellfish dishes. Vegetarian menus are also available as are alcoholic and non-alcoholic pairings for each course. I’m looking forward to returning for lunch one day – perhaps for their 5-course duck menu!

Thank you very much again to HKK for the invitation!

HKK London
88 Worship Street
Broadgate Quarter
London EC2A 2BE

HKK on Urbanspoon

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 5,244 other followers