On our walk back home through Gràcia from our lunch at Rio Teppan, I happened across a restaurant whose name rang a bell in a good way – La Singular. We revisited with Blai’s mom later during our trip and it did turn out to be a great meal. Their €10 menu del dia is creative and brilliant, as evinced by the crowds but there are no reservations taken for lunch so either show up early or show up late to avoid a wait.

To feed the crowds quickly, I can see that first dishes and desserts are made in advance and just plated while second dishes are cooked immediately. Blai started with the Amanida de llentíes amb vinagreta de cumí (lentil salad with cumin vinaigrette). This was brilliant with the earthy cumin playing nicely with zingy vinegar and the equally earthy lentils. Cumin isn’t a common nor popular spice in Catalonia but it was used wonderfully here.

Amanida de Llentíes amb Vinagreta de Cumí

I already knew what I wanted for my first dish when I saw the paella of black rice when we entered the restaurant. Arrós negre amb all i oli was delicious with its squid and mussels and the aioli served with it was clearly homemade with a very light, foamy texture.

Arrós Negre amb All i Oli

Blai’s second dish of an Asian-inspired Ventresca de tonyina amb soja, algues i brots (tuna with soy, seaweed and bean sprouts) was extremely fresh and not too heavy. I loved its simplicity.

Ventresca de Tonyina amb Soja, Algues i Brots

My Cuixetes de pollastre escabetxades amb taronja i hummus de pèsols (chicken legs in a vinegar sauce with orange and pea hummus) was also excellent. The combination wasn’t one I’d ever come across – peas and orange – but by golly, it did work. There are certainly some good ideas coming out of that kitchen.

Cuixetes de Pollastre Escabetxades amb Taronja i Hummus de Pèsols

Desserts were of the very simple sort that I love for everyday. Pastís de pressec (peach cake) was a slice of a simple sponge embedded with chunks of fruit.

Pastís de Pressec

The winner though was a Mousse de mató amb coulis de fruits vermells (fresh cheese mousse with red fruit coulis), all light and fresh.

Mousse de Mató amb Coulis de Fruits Vermells

Definitely a winner, this one! I think the menu changes daily too and from what else I’ve read about the place, there is indeed a thread of Asian-influence running through the Catalan menu. As usual, I’m keen to go back for dinner one day!

La Singular

Carrer de Francisco Giner, 50
08012 Barcelona

My heart was broken when we found that one of my favourite bakeries in Barcelona – Forn Mistral – was closed for holidays in August. Alas, it was a good excuse to visit La Fàbrica Moritz – the former old brewery for the Catalan Moritz beer – which is now a multi-storey restaurant/bar/shop.

From what I can tell, the place is extremely popular – it’s huge and we did find the food to be excellent. The menu is just as huge – but on closer inspection, you’ll find some repetition in the ingredients and how things are put together. This is a good thing as giant menus tend to strike fear in my heart. Anyway, there are lots of little bites and big dishes too; we went with a mixture of tapas and Catalan classics for our dinner that night. There are even some Swiss specialties on the menu in honour of the founder of the Moritz brewery and some German dishes as it’s a brewery!

Croquetes crocants de pernil ibèric were priced by the unit and were exceptional, perfectly creamy and chock full of ham bits. All the frying here was done to perfection (and we are suckers for anything deep fried).

Croquetes crocants de pernil ibèric

El fregit d’Arenys was a mixture of fried monkfish nuggets and quartered artichokes, all served with romesco. Fantastic. (On a separate note, the fish and chips platters that went past us also looked excellent.)

El fregit d'Arenys

Braves d’aqui are their version of patatas bravas (the usual version is also available). This turned out to be the usual fried potatoes topped with aioli and, instead of the more common spicy tomato sauce, a spicy red chilli oil. Very simple and very good (though I think I missed the tomato sauce!).

Braves d'aqui

Coca de recapte artesanal lleidatana was a beautifully thin, savoury pastry topped with escalivada and preserved sardines. It was only as I took the photo that I realised that it looked like the Catalan flag!

Coca de Recapte

Desserts were entirely unexpected – some very creative, some very traditional – and all not the kind of things you see in the usual Catalan restaurants. Blai’s gaspatxo de pressec (the creative) was indeed a cold peach soup topped with a refreshing yogurt ice cream and drizzled with olive oil.

Gaspatxo de Pressec

My Orelletes d´Alacant (the traditional) turned out to be one giant crisp fritter! This sugar dusted piece of fried dough was thin and crisp and not unlike a Canadian BeaverTail (though thinner). There were some anise seeds embedded throughout and was served with a small glass of anis too. I loved this.

Orelletes d´Alacant

Well, holidays for Forn Mistral meant that we discovered La Fàbrica Moritz. It’s a good place for groups or picky eaters as you’ll definitely find something you like on the menu; when we were there, we saw a table of two couples happily tucking into just a ham sandwich each. They’re open from breakfast until late at night; their breakfasts look fantastic but I’ll need to drag myself out of bed for that one day! Personally, I do prefer the atmosphere at Moritz’s other restaurant at El Born but this place has great food too.

La Fàbrica Moritz
Ronda de Sant Antoni, 39-41
08011 Barcelona

There’s a restaurant in Gràcia called La Ceba (The Onion) which specialises in truites – the Catalan word for Spanish tortillas. Their main menu lists truites made with many ingredients, some of which you perhaps cannot imagine in an omelette, as well as other Catalan dishes. We ate there one lunchtime this summer and ordered off their more expensive menu del dia (they have a cheaper one as well – and it also looked good) at €13,80 each. Service from the off was…well, off. The servers were ill-tempered and rushed off their feet at the lunchtime crowd. They seemed to hate our (the diners, any diners) existence. That said, the food is fabulous so perhaps someone’s happy in the kitchen.

A torrada d´escalivada, formatge manxego i anxoves gratinada was a large slice of toast topped with lots of the Catalan grilled vegetables, melted cheese and anchovies. While simple, the toast was delicious in its simplicity and generosity.

Torrada d´Escalivada, Formatge Manxego i Anxoves Gratinada

We had to have a truita, of course – here was a truita de carbassó i patates (courgette and potato). Excellent. It wasn’t overcooked and had just the right egg to filling ratio. Its perfect size inspired me to go out and buy a pan that’s just that diameter (I bought it and it’s great!).

Truita de Carbassó i Patates

I had seen a hamburger go to a neighbouring table and it looked great – we ordered one. This excellent hamburguesa amb ceba caramel.litzada (cooked to a perfect juicy medium) came with salad, fries, and that lovely large dollop of caramelised onions.

Hamburguesa amb Ceba Caramel.litzada

Our other second dish was the Catalan classic botifarra amb mongetes seques – a big grilled fresh sausage with cooked dried beans. Excellent and especially excellent were the beans, which had been fried a little after they had been boiled. Usually you just get boiled beans.

Botifarra amb Mongetes Seques

Notice how both were big, hearty meat dishes – we needed a break from fish after our time on the Costa Brava!

Desserts were an average flam


… and an amazing pastís de formatge (cheese cake) that Blai says was the best he’s had in the city.

Torta de Formatge

So yeah, hopefully it’s not always this grumpy in the restaurant as they’re putting out some terrific food. I’d love to go back in the evening to try one of their many other truites.

La Ceba
C/ La Perla, 10

One of the newest visitor attractions in Barcelona is El Mercat del Born, a former market and wholesale market in Barcelona that functioned from 1878 to 1977. I remember my first visit to Barcelona, over ten years ago, when Blai took me there to peep through the railings and into the then excavation site. For under the market, the ruins of the preexisting 18th century Born neighbourhood were in remarkable condition. Today, the market is El Born Centre Cultural, a cultural centre, all centred around the ruins and holding exhibitions, theatre space, meeting rooms, a shop and a restaurant.



It was, of course, the restaurant that caught my eye and a couple days after our visit to the market, we returned with the whole family to try El 300 del Born, the restaurant run by the local major beer company Moritz and with a menu developed by Jordi Vilà of Alkimia. The space is lovely and light and has, of course, a fantastic view of the ruins (there is a separate entrance to the restaurant from outside when the cultural centre is closed). There are photos all around the restaurant of when the site was still a working market, which made for a great talking point throughout the meal.

What really tickled me though were the menus. On the Catalan menu (which is used as a placemat), many of the items refer to either key points in Catalan history or important Catalan cultural events and details of these are provided as references on the back of the menu. Unfortunately, the English menu lacks these – they should be translated as they’re a great read! Lots of thought had been given to the naming of items in the menu, with lots of ingredients reflecting the historic event or whatnot.

Anyway, onto the food – and it was all Catalan food, making the restaurant a good place for those who’d like to try Catalan cuisine. We ordered a whole lot of things to share between us. First on my list of things to try were bombes. Yes, in English they would indeed be bombs! These deep fried potato croquettes are sauced with aioli and bravas sauce and were originally created to resemble those cartoony spherical bombs that were popular with Catalan anarchists in the politically unstable years around the beginning of the 20th century.

At El 300 del Born, they made different types of bombes with different fillings and sauces and named them after groups and military leaders who were actually involved in the bombing of Barcelona at some point in history. Bombes de la Barceloneta (€4,50) were the traditional ones and which, yes, were originally created in Barceloneta. Bombes de l’Espartero (a Spanish general) (€5,00) were made with morcilla, the Spanish black sausage. Both were excellent.

Bombes de la Barceloneta, la tradicional i Bombes de l'Espartero (amb morcilla)

An Esqueixada tradicional (€9,00) was a traditional Catalan salad of tomatoes, onions and shredded salt cod and was delicious.

Esqueixada tradicional

Patates Felip V (€3,75) were described as patatas bravas of Born but what came out surprised us all! Five roasted potatoes were smothered in aioli and a spicy bravas sauce and were simple but delicious. Felip V was the king whose army defeated Catalonia in 1714, during the War of the Spanish Succession. It’s what the 300 oin the name of the restaurant commemorates (1714-2014). But why five potatoes? Perhaps five for Felip V?

Let's get a closeup of the crazy Patates Felip V at El 300 del Born yesterday! Fabulous!

One section of the menu had a variety of things on slices of bread: these things were the conserved foods that the Catalans do very well, from canned seafood to embotits, their cured meats. Llesca de pa amb espetec (€1,90) was a slice of bread (tomatoed in the style of pa amb tomàquet) with many slices of espetec, a thin cured pork sausage.

Llesca de pa amb espetec

Llesca de pa amb pernil pota negra (€6,00) was similar but with melt in the mouth slices of cured ham made from black footed pigs.

Pernil pota negra

Llesca de pa amb sardina i piquillos (€2,50) was topped with canned piquillo peppers and delicious canned sardines. The quality of the little fishes was outstanding – if only all canned seafood could be like this.

Llesca de pa amb sardina i piquillos

A coca de recapte is a savoury Catalan pastry/flatbread with toppings and our order of a Coca mallorquina (€8,75) came topped with grilled vegetables as well as sobrassada and cheese. The pastry was fabulous – very thin and crispy and the toppings generous.

Coca mallorquina de sobrassada i formatge

We ordered repeats of our favourites – well, with a slight switchup to try as much as possible. Another coca was ordered – this time de recapte tradicional de Cardona (of a traditional recipe from Cardona) (€8,50). Again the pastry here was perfect and the coca was topped with grilled vegetables and sardines.

Coca de recapte tradicional de Cardona

More bombes too! Bombes Prim (€5,00) were filled with tuna and sauced with romesco. Bombes del Comte-duc d’Olivares (€5,50) were filled with oxtail and black olives. Both were, again, excellent.

Bombes Prim (amb romesco i tonyina) i Bombes del Comte-duc d'Olivares (cua de bou amb oliva negra)

We stopped with the savouries there to make room for the sweets. We ordered a few different things on the menu. I forgot to photograph the ice cream, which was a very generous portion in a large glass.

The Tiramisú a la catalana were made not with ladysfingers and Marsala but with melindros, soft Catalan sponge fingers, and vi de Banyuls, a fortified dessert wine from Banyuls.

Tiramisú a la catalana (amb melindros sucats amb vi de Banyuls)

My xocolatada de xocolata negra, cafè i melindros i nata (€5,50 and €0,85 for the whipped cream) were fantastic. The dark and rich hot chocolate had been combined with coffee (surely one the best combinations) and on the side were lemon-tinged melindros. I ordered whipped cream (the nata) on the side as it’s just the best thing ever with hot chocolate!

Xocolatada de xocolata negra, cafè i melindros i nata!

And, of course, being run by a brewery, there’s lots of Moritz’s beers on tap and all at very reasonable prices. There’s even a beer that’s only available at El 300 del Born as it incorporates flavourings popular 300 years ago!

I loved El 300 del Born and hope to return the next time I’m in Barcelona. They’re open every day, except Monday, from breakfast time all the way to midnight and there are many other sweets and savouries that we didn’t get a chance to try this time. I also hope to time my visit to get onto one of the guided tours that take you down into the ruins themselves!

El 300 del Born
Placa Comercial, 12
08003 Barcelona
Catalonia, Spain

We travelled onwards to Barcelona from Marseille, stopping by in Montpellier on the way there. After a whole week of eating out, it felt great to dine on home cooking again, all thanks to my fabulous mother-in-law! And this continued untl a few days into our visit, when we all took a day trip to Banyoles, a beautiful little inland town in northern Catalonia with a huge lake that, legend has it, has a dragon (we didn’t see any – Blai, you owe me a dragon). There’s plenty of history in the town and that lake – that lake! It’s all quite beautiful.

The Lake of Banyoles



It’s a lovely spot to visit if you can. There’s swimming in the lake and lots of nature to enjoy. However, after a long drive there, food was the first thing on our minds. I had done some googling the night before and Blai’s mother had reserved a table for us at Can Banyoles, a restaurant that was only about a five minute walk from the information centre at the lake.

Their lunch menu is only €12 per person (I’ve written about the menú del dia before) and you’ll see soon enough why this is quite the deal if you order well. For my first dish, I chose the local pear tomatoes with ham. These tomatoes were amazing – grown locally and with, yes, a pear shape, they were simple but fantastic. They were ripe and full of flavour and only needed a pinch of salt and a drizzle of olive oil.

Pear Tomatoes with Ham

But Blai and his mother chose even better than I did – they ordered the rice cooked in a cassola. This took absolutely ages to arrive and when we demanded an explanation, we were told that this was cooked to order. What came out was a magnificent sight. That cassola was still bubbling as it was brought to our table.


The rice was portioned out for the two of them but the four of us could have easily shared all this. The rice had been cooked with some pork and peas and was infused with the flavour of seafood as well. It was delicious even if it was a bit on the soupy side. I helped myself to quite a bit as well – so so so good.


Second courses were good and hearty (seriously generous portions here) though not amazing. Blai’s botifarra with a garnish of grilled peppers and boiled green beans and potatoes was fine.

Botifarra and Garnish

Blai’s father’s curry was not too bad – quite a nice curry actually! The meat was tender and had a good spicing.


My calamari was well fried, not too greasy and generously portioned but became a bit dull halfway through. A garnish of some sort would have been nice.


Desserts were very simple but it’s exactly what one wants after all that food. I went with juicy slices of watermelon…


…while Blai’s parents chose the crema catalana…


…and Blai went with a simple slice of torró ice cream.

Ice Cream

So yeah, really quite a bargain for €12, especially if you order that rice. Bookings are essential, even for lunch on a weekday – the place is popular with locals and visitors alike! I understand though that rice is only available on Wednesdays (from a conversation I overheard between a waitress and another customer). Go on a Wednesday!

Restaurant Can Xabanet
Plaça del Carme, 24
17820 Banyoles
Girona, Spain (Catalunya)

Last weekend, I headed down to South Bank to the Streets of Spain festival to try a free Spanish breakfast masterclass courtesy of the Spanish wine brand Campo Viejo. The Spanish wine company was sponsoring the event and holding a number of free masterclasses on both food and wine that long weekend. They had even brought over a number of stalls from the brilliant La Boqueria market of Barcelona and there was even a pop-up tapas restaurant.

At the masterclass venue, we were welcomed by Òscar Ubide i Marcet, the general manager of La Boqueria, who explained what happened at various hours of the market. And how the working hours for many at the market started early and ended with a breakfast – a breakfast that we’d experience at this masterclass.

Oscar, Manager of la Boqueria

Each place had been set with a glass of Campo Viejo cava…apparently the tipple of choice for market traders having breakfast!

Cava for Breakfast

Soon, a plateful of scrambled eggs cooked with mushrooms was set down before us and we helped ourselves to the roving bread platter to mop everything up. The only downside was the amount of salt in the dish; it was just a bit too salty though the eggs and mushrooms were cooked to perfection otherwise.

Mushrooms and Eggs

To my surprise, the chef responsible for our breakfast turned out to be El Quim de la Boqueria, of the stall of the same name – I’ve been wanting to taste his food for some time but never managed to make it there. But next time I’m in Barcelona, I’ll try to get there again! Anyway, that morning he explained how he made the dish with its five different types of mushrooms and a sweet wine reduction (yup, made with a Campo Viejo wine).

El Quim de la treeBoqueria

It was quite a treat to walk out again and encounter stalls from La Boqueria and we may have ended up spending quite a bit on Catalan pork products (my latest thing is the secallona, a dry thin cured pork sausage)! It was a great way to top up our Catalan supplies.


Cheese Stall

Thank you very much to Victoria at Weber Shandwick and to Campo Viejo for the invitation! Please do bring La Boqueria back to London again!

This recipe comes via Blai’s mother and has become one of our favourites. It’s simple to put together, we almost always have all the ingredients lying about at home and the end result tastes fantastic with the tender chicken and almost caramelised onion and tomato pieces. The Catalans rarely roast chickens whole, preferring to cut them first into pieces; I like this – it gives each piece a chance to get its skin nice and crispy. The recipe can easily be scaled to feed more too.

Catalan Roast Chicken

We like to serve it with kale cooked in the Catalan way with raisins and pine nuts and either some good bread to mop up the delectable sauce or some fried potatoes or, even better, both. I’m also particularly fond of squeezing out the roasted garlic onto some bread. I know I’ll be serving this recipe up a few times over the Christmas season this year!

Catalan Roast Chicken
serves 3-4.

4 chicken legs, separated into drumstick and thigh
olive oil
salt and freshly ground black pepper
dried oregano
1 large onion, sliced thickly
2 tomatoes, sliced thickly
3-4 cloves garlic, unpeeled
3 bay leaves
1 cinnamon stick
about 100ml of white wine or cognac

Preheat your oven to 220 Celsius.

Arrange the chicken pieces skin side up in a roasting pan (they should fit in one layer). Rub them all over with olive oil and then dust with salt, pepper and dried oregano. Arrange the onion and tomato slices in between the chicken pieces. Snap the cinnamon stick in half and then also arrange that, the garlic and the bay leaves around the chicken. Drizzle olive oil over all and then splash on the wine/cognac.

Place in the oven and roast, turning twice throughout the cooking process (they should finish with their skin sides up), until fully cooked, skin burnished brown and much of the liquid has cooked down to a thick, almost gravy (this will take somewhere between 1 hour and 1.5 hours). Serve, spooning the sauce and the roasted onion and tomato over.