Here are the recipes for the sweet treats I made for my Marie Curie tea party. They all have a link to my childhood somehow, well except the cupcakes…those were an experiment!

Kuih Bakar

I definitely wanted to bring a kuih of some sort to the tea party; kuihs are Malaysian and Nyonya cakes, usually very brightly coloured and certainly very different to western-style cakes. Coconut and glutinous rice usually feature heavily. I didn’t want to steam, the cooking method used to make many of these sweets, and instead chose to bake one. Kuih bakar it was going to be, literally meaning roasted cake. Coconut milk and pandan and eggs are used, giving it a flavour similar to that of kaya, a Malaysian coconut jam, another popular sweet spread that I loved as a child. However here flour is used to make it a proper cake.

Kuih Bakar

I used this recipe from My Kitchen Snippets, but used only one 400ml can of coconut milk with water to make up the total volume. The batter is alarmingly thin but fear not, it does set in the oven. It was quite delicious with a firm custard like texture but I don’t think it keeps very well; it became a bit too firm after a spell in the fridge. It’s probably one to make and serve on the same day.

Graham Cracker Toffee

Here’s one that my mother used to make for us when I was in high school. It’s pretty much a tooth-rotter but hey, what’s wrong with a bit of that (followed by lots of tooth brushing) once in a while? I remember that she found the recipe on the side of a box of crackers – the recipe does work with savoury crackers such as saltines or matzo (and the recipe is all over the Internet in all its guises); if you use them, leave out the salt on top. If you’re wondering where I purchased graham crackers in London, look for them in Asian shops – I purchased a Filipino brand.

Graham Cracker Toffee

Preheat your oven to 190 Celsius. Toast two large handfuls of flaked almonds in a dry frying pan; set aside to cool. Line a 36cm x 25cm Swiss roll tray with foil and arrange graham crackers in a single layer on top of it. Put 120g unsalted butter and 120g brown sugar in a heavy saucepan and melt together over medium heat. Let it bubble together for about 5 minutes. Pour over the graham crackers, using a silicone spatula to spread it roughly (it will spread more in the oven). Place the tray in the oven for about 10 minutes – the toffee should be bubbling furiously and make sure you pull it out of the oven before it burns. Let it cool for a couple of minutes before scattering on top about 120g chopped dark chocolate. Let it sit for a few minutes before spreading the now melted chocolate evenly over the toffee – top with a bit of fleur de sel (I used a vanilla one) and the toasted almonds. Let cool completely (you can place the tray in the fridge to hasten this) and then snap into presentable chunks.

Mango Cupcakes with Lime Buttercream

OK, here’s something I have to admit – after tasting these, my little experimental cupcakes, I felt that mangoes have no place in baked goods. Perhaps on top of baked goods, yes, but certainly not in the batter/dough itself. That said, some of my colleagues really enjoyed them and perhaps the issue of mangoes-in-baked-goods is quite like Marmite – it must be a love-hate thing.

Mango Cupcakes with Lime Buttercream

Anyway, the cake recipe can be found here at The Baking Stone. I used alphonso mango puree and just straight up all plain flour rather than a mix of white and wholewheat. I also baked the cakes in fairy cake pans so ended up with about 20 cakes altogether rather than 12.

For the lime buttercream, I used 112g of softened unsalted butter and 112g of icing sugar, along with the zest and juice of half a large lime. This was enough for all my cakes. Frost the cakes when they’ve cooled fully.

There was one more sweet cookie that I made for the tea party – lemon blueberry drops.

Lemon Blueberry Drops

However, I feel like I wouldn’t be giving them the respect they deserve by lumping them with the other recipes! It was a recipe my mother made often in Canada and they feature a lot in my memories. I have no idea where she first found the recipe – anyway, I hope to blog them soon!

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